Zeppelin Bend - Detailed Description How to Tie the Zeppelin Bend
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Zeppelin Bend – The Best Way to Tie Two Lines Together?

Zeppelin Bend

​How is it possible that a ​bend that​ gets top grades in all criteria ​for a great knot is almost unknown? We want to change this and make sure the Zeppelin Bend gets the credit it deserves. In this article we give a detailed description on how to tie this super-knot.​

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​Disclaimer

​No responsibility is accepted for incidents arising from the use of this ​tutorial. Make sure to check with an expert before using the knot for any critical application.

​A knot that is often taught ​for tying together two lines of equal diameter is the square knot. Unfortunately, this is not ​a good knot for this use case, as it tends to come undone if the load on the line varies. A better alternative would be the (double) sheet bend which is more secure. But there is another alternative that is both simple and elegant: the Zeppelin Bend.

​The knot is a relatively ​new invention (at least Ashley was not aware of it when he wrote is famous Book of Knots in the 1940s). It got its name from Charles  Rosendahl, an airship commander who ​alledgedly ordered that Zeppelins under his command should be moored with this knot.

​Properties of the Zeppelin Bend

The Zeppelin Bend has all properties one could desire in a knot:

  • it can be tied quickly once you get a hang of it
  • ​the knot is easy to untie even after it has been under heavy load
  • ​it does not come undone accidentally when the lines are not under tension
  • ​the bend does not reduce the breaking strength of the rope as much as other knots

So all in all, the Zeppelin Bend is a pretty interesting knot and we hope that in the future it will receive the attention it deserves. Here is how to tie it:

​Tying the Zeppelin Bend - Step by Step

​The Zeppelin Bend basically consists of two overhand-knots that are interlocked. It has the property of being absolutely symmetrical and thus looks the same from the back and the front side.

​Did you like this tutorial? Do you have suggestions on how to improve it? Do you also know a great knot that we should present here? Leave a comment below and we will get back to you!


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